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Coronavirus: the Life Changer

As time went on, the stories became persistent. The information being passed around seemed to be converging and were starting to sound similar. It felt like the virus had completed its conquest of China and Italy and was getting closer and closer. The number of reported cases in the United States grew. Then the number of cases in Massachusetts inched upwards. There was even a case in my town. Things were getting worse. Fear was starting to circle my heart.
Adanna Eze

Adanna Eze

It’s interesting how something that is seemingly so insignificant at first, could change my life and the lives of others around me. The first time I had heard about the Coronavirus was at school. At first, I thought it was a rumor like most stories passed around the lunchroom. I didn’t put much thought into it since the facts that the clueless highschoolers surrounding me were providing didn’t make much sense. “It’s only in China, I promise,” I would hear from one corner. “It’s all the way in Italy,” I would hear from another. I found myself choosing to only listen to the claims that made me feel better. For example, I’d prefer talking to the people that would say things like – “It’s better than the flu,”. Who wants to hear that  “it’s wiping out thousands of people every day”? Not me.

As time went on, the stories became persistent. The information being passed around seemed to be converging and were starting to sound similar. It felt like the virus had completed its conquest of China and Italy and was getting closer and closer. The number of reported cases in the United States grew. Then the number of cases in Massachusetts inched upwards. There was even a case in my town. Things were getting worse. Fear was starting to circle my heart.

In each of my classes, my teachers started giving us lessons on how online classes would function if we were to miss school. What was happening? Online classes? I observed the total confusion in the eyes of my teachers. They no longer appeared to know everything. When your teachers begin to answer your questions with “nobody really knows”, it is time to panic. Something was desperately wrong. Not even when a bullet shell case was found in my school and we had to go into total lockdown did my teachers seem more alarmed. It was terrifying. 

The day before quarantine began, no one had a clue how it was going to work. In fairness to my teachers, they tried to contain our excitement by telling us we’d be back on Monday. But their tactic didn’t work too well, nor was it very reassuring since they also told us to take all of our notebooks and textbooks home. So when I finally got home after lugging my textbooks off of the bus, and my mom let me know we wouldn’t have school for the week, let’s just say I was pretty excited and also terrified. Thinking back, me believing that the whole pandemic would pass by in a week was pretty naive, but hey, I was excited about my week off. 

On Monday, my school sent out an email telling us all to pick up any binders we may have left at school, and any laptops if needed. I went in with my mom and my siblings, and it was like a ghost town in the school building, like something you saw in movies. We were the only family there at that time and I had never seen my school that empty. In a way it was sad. A place that was always teaming with noisy, vibrant and obnoxious kids looked desolate and cold. 

But I must commend my school for getting it together and being one of the first schools to establish a solid learning from home program. Thinking about it, I don’t even think the ice age could stop my school from educating me at this point. So, when I finally got all of my supplies, we started learning right away. Most days, my morning routine didn’t vary. I loved to sleep and I would wake up so late that it was embarrassing, get ready, work on school work, attend mandatory zoom classes, and get on with my day. Fortunately, this new quarantine thing didn’t affect my sleep schedule, so I was pretty happy with it. 

As time went on, after the governor kept extending the date school would resume, we all started adjusting to our new lifestyle. I have personally grown to like it. There’s something to be said for making my own schedule. I’m not saying I’m happy this all happened. I am still terrified of the virus but I’m just happy I found a silver lining to this unfortunate situation. 

Adanna is a 9th grader and can be reached on Instagram @adanna.eze. She would love to read your comments.

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This Post Has 15 Comments

  1. Ava p

    This is beautifully written Adanna. Great job!

  2. Ava

    Loved this article Adanna❤️ very nice wording

  3. NJ

    Adanna,
    I absolutely loved reading your perspective on the Covid-19. You will go places. I am looking forward to your first book. Please keep me in the loop.
    NJ
    Boston, MA

  4. Josephine

    Wow congratulations Ada. This is so well written, and you are only in 9th grade. Sometimes you wonder why I call you BRAIN. This is the reason.❤️💕
    Josephine
    Pittsburgh, PA

  5. Ngozi

    This is a beautiful article, so well thought out, so well organized. She is only in grade nine I see. This young lady will go far. Very, very proud of this Ene brain 👏🏿👏🏿

  6. Afam

    Beautiful write up Ada. Well done.
    Afam,
    Toronto, Canada

  7. Stéphane Joanis

    Nicely done Adanna,

    I commend you for your excellent way do communicating your feelings and astute observations. I’m proud of you.

    You have a beautiful skill in your mastery of the English language.

    Uncle Stéphane

  8. Grace

    Adanna, your article on Nigerian Parents was very insightful. I hope kids your age will continue to chime in on important conversations such as COVID-19. Congratulations. Utah

  9. Chizoluonye

    Learning from home is the safest for now. You have got no choice than to keep attending your e-classes. I so love your views and write-ups by the way. You are making us proud.

  10. Oluchi

    I feel the exact same way being a student in Massachusetts. It’s crazy how this all happened so fast. It’s difficult trying to find positives in these hard times, but it is also essential. Hopefully this will be over soon.

  11. Chidera Nwachukwu

    Having to take classes online is very different from what I am used to. When I first heard that we were transitioning to online school, I thought that there was no way that I would be able to process information successfully through a computer screen. I definitely have gotten used to it though, as it has been a whole month. Sometimes it is hard to fall into an efficient schedule since we are all at home. But getting enough sleep, knowing when to put your phone down, and studying often can keep you in the right mindset. Good luck!!

  12. Joan Odibendi

    Beautiful write up. At least, I learned a few words

  13. Ogo

    Ada nne deeme. Just went through the piece and I must not fail to commend a wonderful write up from such a young one. Keep it up dear.

  14. Myriam

    I am so proud. Beautifully done.

  15. Onyia Clement

    Wow, this is compelling and interesting read. It captured the roller-coaster mood swings most people felt and ….. Staying at home, and not border about school or work comes in handy as a fair exchange for the anxiety and desperation. Chiamanda Adichie move over, Adanna Eze is on her way. Well done. I am very proud of you.

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